contact us

Use the form on the right to contact us.

Or email us directly at info@cnclarkcompany.com

1403 Person Street
Durham, NC 27703
USA

(919) 956-5331

We specialize in military and UL labels.

"Good to Know" - Blog

MIL-L-15040 -- What does it really specify?

Judy Gaitens-Arneson

The one thing I do that drives my husband completely batty is using a tool for something other than its intended purpose. If I even suggest that a flat head screwdriver could be considered an all-purpose chisel/pry bar/putty knife/hammer/screwdriver combination, I am barred from the garage.

Oddly, this kind of "one size fits all" may be why MIL-L-15040 ("Labels, Garment (Woven, Rayon)") is often called for in aerial equipment drawings. I imagine the product designers thought "It's a label spec. Why not?"

Last amended in 1973 and re-validated in 1987,  the labels covered by MIL-L-15040 "are intended for use in dress clothing items where they will be permanently visible and the use of another type label would adversely affect the appearance of the item." (Section 6.1). So they were envisioned as being more for fine woolen coats than for harnesses. 

It's not that you CAN'T use these labels for other purposes, but why would you want to? Woven labels are rather expensive in quantities less than 1000, they are difficult to stamp lot numbers and dates of manufacturing on, and they are more difficult to sew onto webbing.

There is, instead, a better standard to employ-- MIL-DTL-32075 "Label: For Clothing, Equipage, and  Tentage, (General Use)". In it, the Type VI label is the one we'd recommend -- Type VI is a durable, easy to stamp, easy to sew fabric. Perfect for permanently labeling aerial equipment!

Next time you get a drawing that calls for labeling per MIL-L-15040, check with the procuring officer to see if it can be amended to allow labeling IAW MIL-DTL-32075, Type VI.  Not that employing a screwdriver as a staple remover is necessarily a bad idea, but if you have the right tool to begin with, why not use it instead?